23 September 2009

Coffee Cup Browsing

Globalist hypocrites gather to preach to the Unwashed Masses about "climate change"

You aren't disappointed if you never thought he was the Messiah

The Catholic Medical Association speaks out on B.O. Care.

Big trouble for Mahony in L.A. Former vicar for clergy is telling tales at trial.

Continuing toil and trouble over New Age oogie-boogie nonsense in Catholic hospitals

A feline with too much time on his hands. . .er. . .paws

Unicorns of the Apocalypse! (they look scared)

A lot of VERY cool photographs

How you are going to die
. . .or, the chances that you will be consumed by a fleshing-eating bacteria during a domestic terrorist attack; that is if cancer and heart disease don't get you first

No amount of money would get me in this thing. . .very large doses of Xanax might

8 comments:

  1. Scott W.8:05 AM

    From the Reiki article are quotes from the woman practicing reiki:

    “The bishops did not do their research,’’ she says. “Reiki is not a belief system, not a cult, not a weirdo thing.’’

    And then,

    “It must have been a slow day at the Vatican,’’

    Well, I think this lady must have missed Reading Comprehension day, because the guidline says,

    Superstition corrupts one’s worship of God by turning one’s religious feeling and practice in a false direction.’’

    A practice doesn't have to be formally attached to a cult or belief system to be superstitious. Heck, even Catholic sacramentals like holy water or scapulars can be used superstitiously. So she lolfails on that point. That it is not a "weirdo thing" is highly debateable. Also, while I am not an expert on Eastern mysticism, I'm pretty darn sure "ki" is a part of a belief system.

    “It’s unfortunate, because people can benefit from this.’’

    Well good morning to you belief system! I had a feeling if we kicked over the rotting log we'd find our old pal consequentialism sleazing about.

    And then the eye-roller at the end:

    “Galileo was denounced by the Catholic Church,’’ she says. “I don’t mind being in his company.’’

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but a. Galileo belived in heliocentrism which is wrong and b. Galileo was able to reconcile with the Church. If so, maybe she ought to follow the example.

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  2. Scott, yeah, it's ironic that the ones who condemn the Church for being know-nothing actually know nothing about history.

    The fav dodge among dissenters is to say that the Church isn't condemning what they believe b/c the Church doesn't understand them.

    Yawn.

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  3. Christian9:50 AM

    I didn't see "Sears Tower SkyDeck" (re: last link) listed amongst the "How you are going to die" statistics, so I think you'd be just fine ... :)

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  4. About the Reiki thing: it proves the power of the placebo effect. As the townspeople said on The Simpsons, "Where can we get these placebos?"

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  5. not enough Xanax on the planet for me bud. not enough booze either.

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  6. I admit to similar feelings about climate change - lots of people with opinions who have no or little knowledge of the science, or history of the field.

    Not, of course, that it matters, as I suspect it's far too late to do much of anything.

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  7. Michelle,

    I'm not a conspiracy nut but I play one on the internet...global warming is about global governance...it has nothing to do with the weather or science.

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  8. That article about reiki sure hit some buttons here at home. We have a retreat center here (well, one of several) run by some elderly Franciscan sisters, very nice little old ladies, who used to offer reiki classes about four times a year. When the mandate came down, OF COURSE they followed it. Now they offer classes in "Healing Touch" therapy. Yeah.

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